Over the years, I have come to have a love/hate relationship with Facebook. I love the connectedness I have with the various groups of people in my life. I hate that I can spend too much time chasing updates. I like when people share funny or interesting updates. I hate that the updates have now become non-stop articles about the orange haze. No, I’m not going to name that, but I’m sure you have a good idea already.

This has become the great crazy maker (to borrow that Artist’s Way phrase) of our time. I’ve gotten to where I’ve gotten rid of the personal crazy makers in my life such as certain friends, a significant other, and even a toxic mentor and my challenge became to cultivate sane contacts, whether they have been in my life for a while or I starting to know them. Now there’s a crazy maker in the background and I didn’t say yes. It’s more like having someone scream outside my house nonstop and I don’t want to acknowledge him, so I play the music to maximum volume.

I understand I’m not alone. I see it on friends’ posts. The problem has become that it’s all I see now.

Before, my problem was that Facebook took my time, my thoughts, and words. I resented yet, yet I could not stop.

Every year, I see friends give up Facebook for Lent. Forty days they don’t post and then they are back at it again. I’ve never tried it as I try to turn this abstaining practice of Lent into something life-changing. It doesn’t always work out that way, but that is the intention.

Here, I have to acknowledge that Facebook changed my life. I’m not saying that it’s great, but i’m not saying it’s horrible. I don’t always like it, though.

There is the orange haze I mentioned earlier. That it shows up in my newsfeed constantly makes me feel like I’m forced to stare at something with my eyelids cut off. There’s the time suck that was an issue long before. And it has a way of taking up time that can be used for reading or writing.

The funny thing is since Facebook is still primarily a text medium is that it doesn’t add greatly to the reading anyone does. I believe that it’s that the reading one does on Facebook isn’t active. People often react and miss things and context is lost. And outrage takes over everything.

In the midst of all that, I see posts that add up to compelling stories. I see interesting ideas and insights from friends. However, it’s the reactive side of posts I see more.

For me, if I decided to try to quit Facebook cold turkey, I would be back right away. It’s what happened when I tried removing the app from my iPhone and iPad. I re-downloaded them shortly after.

I have found that making these blog posts have helped. I don’t want to take as much time as I have before. I haven’t posted this much this week. It’s an opportunity to rethink how I engage on that medium and how much I want to engage elsewhere. It’s also made me think of how I can use that time for things I want to do such as writing and my artwork.

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